Antispades Weak Twos

From Games
Revision as of 11:48, 7 December 2016 by Gavin Wilson (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

AN INTRODUCTION

0.0 Notation

Symbol
Meaning
(x)
a bid by an opponent.
  • Thus (1) means an opposition bid of 1.
⟪x⟫
the number of tricks this player can make as declarer if this suit were trumps if both players play optimally, double-dummy.
  • Thus ♣ J 7 6 4 ⟪5⟫ (or ⟪5⟫ ♣ J 7 6 4) means the player with this club holding would make 5 tricks as declarer, if clubs were trumps.
x+
x or more.
  • Thus '4+ card suit' means a suit of at least four cards.
x-y
a range, including x and y and all values in between.
  • Thus '0-6 HCP' means a range from 0 HCP to 6 HCP.
X•Y
the association created by X and Y.
  • Thus E•W means the partnership created by East and West.
x/y
x or y.
  • Thus '1/4' means 1 or 4.
x y z
a suit holding consisting of x, y and z.
  • Thus ' Q 7 2' means a heart holding of the Q, 7 and 2.
[x y z]
a footnote reference.
{x,y}
either to the lengths of an unordered pair of suits or to the unordered lengths of a partnership's holdings in the same suit. {x,y} means exactly the same as {y,x}.
  • Thus '{5,4} in the majors' means 4 hearts and 5 spades or 5 hearts and 4 spades.
  • And 'Trumps broke {3,2}' means one opponent had three trumps and other had two.
  • And by extension, 'The shape of her hand was {5,4,4,0}' means that she had five cards in one unspecified suit, four in another, four in another, and a void in the fourth suit.
(x,y)
an ordered pair.
  • Thus '(3,6) in hearts and spades' means the player has 3 hearts and 6 spades.
╢x:y┇z╟
the bidding sequence: x, then y, then z.
  • Thus ╢1:(No):1NT:(No)┇No:(No)╟ describes a complete auction.
HCP
The Sigma Count, a measure of distribution, equal to the sum of the lengths of a hand's two longest suits, less the length of the shortest suit, less five.
  • for a hand ranges from -1 to 8.
§
a section in the book.
  • Thus 'Refer to §6.2' asks the reader to refer to section 6.2
(F)
Forcing for one round — that is, partner cannot pass if her RHO passes.
(GF)
Game Force. Neither partner may pass until a game contract is reached.
(NF)
Not Forcing. Partner may pass.
(SD)
Shut Down. A bid that shuts down the auction between the two partners.
his
his or her
her
her or his
their
their or his or her.
the red claw symbol means that this topic can be ignored on first reading — not because it requires great experience or intelligence, but because the variations are complex and the situation arises rarely. Partnerships need to get on top of the basics before tackling the abstruse.
the start of a group of related text-fields.
the end of a group of related text-fields.
a separator between two text-fields.
Dbl
Double.
An alertable bid.
UNFAV
The vulnerability is unfavourable — that is, our side is vulnerable and their side is not.
OTHER
The vulnerability is anything other than unfavourable — that is, either both sides are vulnerable, or neither side is vulnerable, or their side is vulnerable and our side is not.
Stop — that is, a jump bid.
#
Board number.
Depiction of a bridge table.
A link to another part of the book immediately follows this arrow.

1.0 Pre-amble: Counting Losers

We cannot cope with half-losers, so we operate a simple counting system:

  • A is always a WINNER.
  • K is a WINNER unless the suit is a singleton.
  • Q with another honour in the suit is a WINNER, unless the suit is a doubleton and partner has not shown the suit, when it is a LOSER.
  • Q without another honour in the suit is a LOSER, unless partner has shown the suit, when it is always a WINNER.
  • If you have two suits headed by Q-x-x, count 5 losers — not 6 — for those suits.
  • The remaining honours — i.e. J and 10 — are always LOSERS except with an A or K. Specifically A-J-10 and K-J-10 can be valued as one-loser holdings.

Thus A-Q doubleton is valued at one loser unless partner has shown the suit, when it is valued at zero losers.

Normally one adds partner's losers to your own and subtracts the sum from 24 to determine the likely number of tricks.

But when you have no 4+ card suit (apart from trumps) opposite partner's single-suiter, you can subtract your total losers from 25.

2.0 What do you need to open an Antispades Weak Two?

  • 5-10 HCP, and
  • 6-8 losers (6-7 losers unfavourable), and
  • 6 cards in a suit (not spades) or have at least {4,5} in any two suits, and
  • If you open a 4-card suit, it must be headed by a top honour (A, K or Q).
  • If you open a 6+ card suit and you do not have a second 4+ card suit, it must be headed by a top honour.

Note: If your hand is unbalanced and satisfies the Rule-of-19, open one of a suit instead, particularly if your longest suit is spades. Using this guideline, you will find that you open most 6-loser hands at the 1-level rather than the 2-level.

Note: With 0-10 HCP and a {5,4,4,0} shape where the void is spades, pass!

3.0 What are the Weak Openings in Antispades?

  • 2♣  : 6-card club suit, or
    • Clubs and Diamonds, or
    • Clubs and Spades.
  • 2  : 6-card diamond suit, or
    • Diamonds and Hearts, or
    • Diamonds and Spades.
  • 2  : 6-card heart suit, or
    • Hearts and Spades, or
    • Hearts and Clubs.

So, all roads lead to the possibility of spades, but none starts with spades.

Note that you should not necessarily open your longer suit first. If, for example, you have five spades and four hearts, you should always open 2. (ref: w9)

3.1 What if your hand is two-suited but one of the suits also contains six cards?

If your hand is two-suited and you have a 6-card suit, follow the normal guidelines above. Only open the 'wrong' suit when you would otherwise be opening a 4-card suit which does not contain a top honour.

  • So with four hearts and six clubs, open 2. (Because hearts is the impossible suit when one opens 2♣.)
  • But with four diamonds and six clubs, open 2♣.
  • And with six diamonds and four clubs, open 2♣ so long as you have a top honour in clubs.

4.0 Where is our Strong Bid?

Bizarrely it is 2♠:

  • 2♠: 23+ balanced, or 16+ HCP and either single-suited hand of 4 losers or fewer, or two-suited hand of 3 losers or fewer.
  • But with a single-suiter in clubs or diamonds and 4 or more losers, open 1♣ and 1. (This is because the 3♣ and 3 rebids after a 2♠ opening have conventional meanings.)
  • Responder bids 2NT as an automatic relay.

4.1 Opener's Rebids after a 2♠ Opening

  • Opener's rebids are:
    • 3NT: 23-26 balanced — your hand may also be two-suited but contain 4 losers. (See 432-424-1.)
    • 4NT: 27+ balanced
    • 3♣: Torrington: a two-suited hand containing 3 losers or fewer.
    • 3: Opener Stayman: 23-26 points balanced with at least one 4-card major but not 4-3-3-3 shape. (See 245-222-1.)
    • 3 or 3♠: 4-loser hand
    • 4-of-a-suit: 3-loser hand
    • 5-of-a-suit: 2-loser hand
  • The sequence 2♠:2NT, 3NT:4♣ is Responder Stayman, promising 4+ cards in each major.
    • Opener bids 4 with no 4-card major; otherwise he bids his major at the 4-level.
      • After 4 by opener:
        • 4NT is to play, and
        • 4-of-a-major promises 5+ cards in the major. 4NT by opener is then to play, taking into account responder's implied 9+ cards in the majors.
      • After 4/4♠ by opener, 4NT is RKCB.
  • The sequence 2♠:2NT, 3NT:4NT shows 7-8 points with no 4+ card major.
  • After 2♠:2NT, 3NT, 4 and 4 are both transfer bids, showing a 5+ card major and 0-5 HCP.

4.2 Two-suited Hands with three losers or better — 2♠:2NT, 3♣ — Torrington

brick a31
builds on brick(s): a28
2♠:2NT, 3♣ (F) is Torrington, showing a two-suited hand of 3 losers or fewer.
  1. Responder bids 3 (F) relay, whatever his hand.
  2. Opener then bids his cheapest 4+ card suit (F), unless he has 4 clubs and 5+ diamonds, when he bids 4 (F).
    • If opener has bid 4♣ or 4, showing the minors, responder then applies judgement. (END OF TORRINGTON SEQUENCE)
  3. If opener has bid one of the other two possibilities — that is, 3 (F) or 3♠ (F) — then responder, with 4+ card support, either raises to game (with 9+ losers) (NF) or bids 4NT (F) (with fewer losers). (END OF TORRINGTON SEQUENCE)
  4. With 0-3 cards in opener's major, responder simply relays with the next available bid (F) — i.e. 3♠ or 3NT.
  5. Opener then bids his second suit at the cheapest level, bidding 3NT (NF) if his second suit is spades.
  6. Responder then applies his judgement. 4NT (F) by responder tells opener that responder has the other two suits, 8 losers or fewer, with at least one Ace or King, and slam interest. It invites opener to bid 6 of his better suit if it should run with a singleton in support, or 5 of his better suit if it should run with a doubleton in support.
(Use your Kindle's 'Back' button to return to where you were.) 【Glossary】 【Notation】


Torrington Used to be:

  • With 9 losers or more, responder bids his cheapest 2+ card suits up the line at the 3-level, bidding 3NT if he cannot agree opener's 4+ card suit or bid another 2+ card suit at the 3-level.
    • Opener then shows the cheaper of his two 4+ card suits. Responder cannot pass until at least game is reached. Opener should not assume that responder's bid suits are longer than two cards.
  • With 8 losers or better, responder shows his cheapest 4+ card suit at the 4-level.
    • Opener then bids the cheaper of his two 4+ card suits. Bidding of 4+ card suits proceeds up the line. Both players must use deduction, and careful use of 4NT RKCB where necessary, to ensure slam is not missed.
  • If Opener rebids a suit rather than bids his (senior) second suit, this means that the rebid suit contains 5+ cards.
  • If responder bids 4NT and is unsure which of the two suits to bid slam in, he chooses the cheaper slam first, for opener to pass or correct

4.3 Opener Stayman — 2♠:2NT, 3 promising 23-26 and at least one four-card major

Responder bids:

  • 3NT with no 4+ card major.
  • 3 with 4+ hearts. Opener replies 3♠ with spades, or 4 with hearts.
  • 3♠ with 4+ spades and 0-3 hearts. Opener replies 3NT if his major is hearts or 4♠ with suit agreement.

5.0 What happens if I have 6 spades in a Weak Hand?

  • If you have a hand containing 6 spades which you cannot open 2♣/2/2, you can open it 1♠ if it satisfies the Rule of 19.
  • Unless you have another 4+ card suit, you may have to pass.
    • In which case, plan to bid 2♠ on the next round if you can, whatever happens!
    • A jump response of 2♠ by a passed hand to a one-level suit opening — e.g. No:(No):1:(No), 2♠ — guarantees exactly 6 spades and 6-8 losers.

6.0 Responses to an Antispades Weak Two

6.1 Raise to the Losing Trick Level

Raise with support for opener's suit, x. If opener's bid promises 6-8 losers, then:

  • 3x shows 7 losers and 3+ cards in x.
  • 4x shows 5-6 losers and 4+ cards in x. (3-card support is insufficient; prefer to underbid by raising to 3x.)
  • 5x shows 5 losers and 4+ cards in x.

But if opener's bid promises 7-8 losers — because, for example, vulnerability is unfavourable — then:

  • 3x shows 8 losers and 3+ cards in x.
  • 4x shows 6-7 losers and 4+ cards in x. (3-card support is insufficient; prefer to underbid by raising to 3x.) (ref: w9)
  • 5x shows 6 losers and 4+ cards in x.

6.2 After an Opening of 2♣ or 2 or 2, a bid of the cheaper of opener's two alternative suits is weak and non-forcing. (PASS-OR--CORRECT)

  • It is a 'Pass or Correct' bid, which promises at least a 2-card holding in the suit bid. (ref: w8)
  • Opener should alert responder's Pass-or-Correct bid, and if asked, say something along the following lines:
    • 'Promises at least two cards in the suit bid, and up to 14 HCP.'
  • It promises at least as many cards in the suit bid as in the suit bid by opener, and usually at least as many in the other possible suit. (ref: w2, w3, w6, w8)
  • Occasionally you will have to respond with the 'pass-or-correct' suit when you have the 'pass' suit but not the 'correct' suit.
    • In this situation, responder must rebid 2NT when he does not have the 'correct' suit.
  • If responder rebids his suit at the 3-level, after initially bidding it at the 2-level, this promises 6+ cards in the suit.
  • Responder should be happy to pass opener's second suit with 3+ card support. (ref: w3, w6)
  • With exactly 7 losers and 4+ spades and a fairly balanced shape, prefer to bid the Pass-or-Correct suit if it is also longer than your holding in opener's suit, instead of responding 2♠.
    • If opener then rebids 2♠, you should raise this to 3♠.
brick a19
builds on brick(s): a2, a3, a15 and a17
Pass-or-Correct Responses — 2♣:2 (NF), 2:2 (NF) and 2:2♠ (NF)
  • After an Antispades Weak Two Opening, the next bid up — for example, 2♣:2 (NF) — is a Pass-or-Correct response (of the so-called 'PoC suit') requiring responder to have:
    • 0-14 HCP, and
    • 9 losers or better, and
    • At least as many cards in the suit he is bidding — is this case — as he has in the suit opener has bid, and
    • At least as many cards in the other possible suit opener might have (♠ is this case) as he has in the suit opener has bid, or 6+ cards in the suit he is bidding, or 7+ cards in the fourth suit — in this case, and
    • Unable to respond 2♠ to either 2♣ or 2, and unable to respond 2NT to 2.
  • If responder has the same number of cards in opener's bid suit as in each of the two possible suits — typically 3 in each suit — then responder's decision whether to pass or bid the PoC suit rests on his HCP distribution: if he has more HCP in opener's bid suit than in the PoC suit, he should pass.
(Use your Kindle's 'Back' button to return to where you were.) 【Glossary】 【Notation】


brick a20
builds on brick(s): a19
Pass-or-Correct Rebids — Pass, 2NT, or correcting to opener's 2nd suit

After an Antispades Weak Two Pass-or-Correct response, opener should:

  • Pass with 4+ cards in responder's suit, or
  • Bid 2NT (NF) if no second suit, or
  • Bid his second suit (NF).
(Use your Kindle's 'Back' button to return to where you were.) 【Glossary】 【Notation】

6.3 But if you cannot make the Pass-or-Correct response of §6.2, it is OK to PASS with 8+ losers and 2+ cards in opener's suit.

  • With 8 losers and 3+ cards in support of opener's suit, be happy to pass. (ref: w8a)

6.4 A 2♠ response by an unbid hand is forcing after a 2♣ or 2 opening.

  • promises 4+ spades and no more than 7 losers. (ref: s18, w5)
  • is forcing for one round.
  • Opener's rebid options are as follows:
    • 3♠: 7 losers and 3+ spades. (ref: s18)
    • 4♠: 6 losers or better and 4+ spades.
    • 2NT: 2nd suit is the other suit. (ref: w5)
    • 3-of-original-suit: no 2nd suit.
  • A 2♠ bid by a passed hand is non-forcing and suggesting that spades are a better place to play than the suit partner has opened.

6.5 When you have a choice of responses...

  • With a choice between raising opener's suit and bidding 2♠:
    • Always respond 2♠ first. If opener doesn't have spades, you can always make the raise of his opening suit.
  • With a choice between raising opener's suit and bidding 2NT:
    • Always respond 2NT first unless you can only raise partner to the 3-level and opener's reply might take you above that.
  • With a choice between responding 2♠ and 2NT:
    • Always bid 2♠.
  • With a choice between responding 2♠ and the Pass-or-Correct (PoC) suit:
    • Respond 2♠ unless you have exactly 7 losers and your holding in the PoC suit is longer than your holding in opener's suit.

6.7 A RESPONSE OF THE 'IMPOSSIBLE' SUIT IS WEAK AND PROMISES 7+ CARDS

  • There is always one suit that opener denies with his Antispades bid. This will often be the suit that responder has, but it is usually best for responder to stay quiet when weak, unless he is longer in this suit than opener could possibly be in any of his.
  • Thus 2♣:2, 2:3♣ and 2:3 all promise 7+ cards and 0-12 HCP.

6.8 A 2NT response by an unbid hand is a strong enquiry, promising 15+ HCP and denying 4+ spades after a 2♣ or 2 opening, or after a 2 opening promising 15+ HCP or 4+ spades and 7 losers or better.

brick a17
builds on brick(s): a2, a3 and a6
The 2NT Enquiry
  • After an Antispades 2♣ or 2 Opening, the 2NT Enquiry response (F) shows:
    • 15+ points and
    • 0-3 spades.
  • After an Antispades 2 Opening, the 2NT Enquiry response (F) shows:
    • Either 15+ points, or
    • 4+ spades and no more than 6 losers (OTHER) or 7 losers (UNFAV).
  • But the rare 2NT response by a passed hand (NF) is to play.
(Use your Kindle's 'Back' button to return to where you were.) 【Glossary】 【Notation】


brick a18
builds on brick(s): a17
Responses to the 2NT Enquiry

Opener's options are, in order of preference:

  1. If opener has exactly 4 spades, he bids 3NT (NF).
  2. If opener has 5+ spades, he bids 3♠ (NF).
  3. If opener has a different second suit, he should bid it at the 3-level (NF).
  4. With no second suit, opener should rebid his 6+ card at the 3-level (NF).
(Use your Kindle's 'Back' button to return to where you were.) 【Glossary】 【Notation】
Q. How does responder find out which of opener's two suits contains 5+ cards?
A. Responder bids the cheapest unbid suit. Opener then replies with his cheapest 5+ card suit.

6.9 THE ABNORMAL 3♠ SHOWS 5 LOSERS OR FEWER AND AT LEAST A 5-5 SHAPE IN THE TWO NON-SPADES SUITS.

Opener's rebid options are as follows:

  1. Bid 4NT Blackwood.
  2. Bid Game in his preferred suit of the two that responder has shown.

6.10 The Rythe Manœuvre, showing a weak hand containing a 7+ card suit

brick a21
builds on brick(s): a19 and a20
Responding with a 7+ card suit when weak — the Rythe Manœuvre

When you have a 7+ card suit, 0-14 points, and 0-2 cards in opener's bid suit:

  • STEP 1: If you have as many or more cards in the Pass-or-Correct suit than in opener's suit, bid the Pass-or-Correct suit — for example 2♣:2 (NF).
  • STEP 2: If you have 3+ card support for opener's second suit, pass. Otherwise, bid 3 of your long suit (SD). This is the Rythe Manœuvre.
(Use your Kindle's 'Back' button to return to where you were.) 【Glossary】 【Notation】

7.0 If the opponents double our 2♣ / 2 / 2 opening

  • When you have suit support, take the higher bid resulting from:
    • Losing Trick Level, on the presumption that partner has opened with 7 losers.
    • Total Trump Level, on the presumption that partner has 5 cards in his bid suit. (ref: w9)
      • Thus if, for example, LTC says bid 4x while TT says 2x, you should bid 4x. (In some cases, it may be better to take the average and bid 3x.)
      • If LTC says bid 3x while TT says 4x, you should always bid 4x.
  • Redouble by responder says: "I don't like your suit. Please rebid your second suit, unless you have 6 cards in your original suit."
  • Redouble by opener says: "I have just four cards in the suit I opened and my second suit contains 6+ cards. If you don't have 3+ cards in my original suit, please bid your cheapest 2+ card suit of the two possible suits."

8.0 If the opponents bid a non-jump Overcall of our 2♣ / 2 / 2 opening at the Two- or Three-level

  • When you have suit support, take the higher bid resulting from:
    • Losing Trick Level, on the presumption that partner has opened with 7 losers.
    • Total Trump Level, on the presumption that partner has 5 cards in his bid suit. (ref: w9)
      • Thus if, for example, LTC says bid 4x while TT says 2x, you should bid 4x. (In some cases, it may be better to take the average and bid 3x.)
      • If LTC says bid 3x while TT says 4x, you should always bid 4x.
  • 2NT still shows 16+ HCP and does not promise a stopper.
  • A new suit bid by responder at the two-level shows the same as without the overcall.
  • A new suit bid by responder at the three-level (provided it is one of the two suits opener might have) promises 4+ cards and 7 losers or fewer and a willingness to play in the other two suits that opener might have.
  • Double by responder is negative i.e. showing 0-3 cards in partner's bid suit and promises no more than 7 losers plus:
    • If the opponent has bid the suit that opener cannot have, the negative double is for takeout, almost always promising 4+ spades and usually 4+ cards in the other possible suit.
    • If the opponent has bid a suit that opener could have, the double promises 4+ cards in the other possible suit.
    • In the case of two-level overcalls, the negative double promises less than 16 HCP. (With 16+, responder would bid 2NT.)
  • If opener rebids a major at the 2-level — e.g. 2♣:(2):No:(No), 2♠ — that promises 5+ cards in the major and 6 losers, or 6+ cards and 7 losers.

Bibliography

  • Gavin Wilson (2016). Antispades Twos — Open Markedly More Often. Claygate: Org2B Press. [1]